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Cemeteries

These cemeteries are sources of history, heritage and cultural record.

Erindale Cosmopolitan Cemetery and Streetsville Public Cemetery are both active cemeteries with lots available for purchase.

Britannia Church is a good representation of the rural interpretation of High Victorian Gothic style. Some of the High Victorian Gothic features include its dichromatic brickwork, non-structural buttresses, pointed arch openings and distinct chancel oriented towards the east.

History

Britannia Church and Gardner Cemetery are located on land that was donated by Joseph Gardner in 1830. The church was originally called Gardner’s Chapel or Gardner’s Methodist Church. The current building replaced a log structure, built in 1821 on the north corner of where the present church sits.

The church is believed to have been built in 1843, as its datestone under the front entrance gable indicates. However, the structure only acquired its current appearance after extensive renovations in 1864 and again in 1897 to accommodate its growing population. During the later renovation, a basement was excavated and the interior was updated.

The cemetery is located to the east and south of the church. An iron fence was erected around the land in 1949. The gravesites are separated with individual markers. Established in 1830, the first burials in the cemetery are recorded as having begun in 1837. The cemetery was enlarged in 1910 as well as in 1933.

Location

5961 Hurontario Street
Mississauga, ON

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Derry West Cemetery is typical of a nineteenth century cemetery. The property formed part of the village of Derry West. The monuments convey historic importance in their layout, arrangement, form, symbolism and material.

History

Derry West Anglican is one of the earliest cemeteries of the Toronto Township. This property was the site of the original Hurontario Carter’s Anglican Church in the hamlet of Derry West. It was built in 1829 by Joseph Carter.

The first burials likely began in the 1830s and continued all the way through 1867 until the town of Derry West came to its demise due to a village fire. Burials were still ongoing after that year but they were far less frequent. The last known burial was Mary J. Graham in 1936.

Location

25 Derry Road West
Mississauga, ON

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Dixie Union Chapel is constructed of stone from the nearby Etobicoke River. This building, also known as the Stone Chapel, is a rare surviving example of a “union” chapel from the settlement period of Upper Canada.

History

The present Chapel was erected in 1837 through the efforts of John Silverthorn, Allen Robinet and Daniel Harris who were prominent early settlers of Toronto Township. The adjacent cemetery dates back to 1810.

Location

707 Dundas St E
Mississauga, ON

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Eden Cemetery was a burying ground for many of the area’s earliest pioneers and represents nineteenth century cemetery design.

The markers and monuments with their inscriptions, ornamentation, styles, materials and symbolism reflect the important link not only to the inhabitants of Lisgar but to the overall history of Mississauga.

History

Eden Cemetery started prior to 1840 on the farm of John Switzer. John Switzer received the farm in 1834 from his father Samuel. In 1840, John Switzer sold 42 perches for five pounds to five trustees of the Wesleyan Methodist Church for the site of a chapel and burying ground. Today, the cemetery stands alone as the Eden Church was demolished in August of 1980.

Location

2830 Derry Road West
Mississauga, ON

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This is an active cemetery that has served the community for generations. The arrangement, symbolism and material of the monuments contribute to our understanding of the historical figures that they commemorate.

History

The cemetery was originally formed for those who did not belong to the Church of England. As a result, it adjoins St. Peter’s Anglican Cemetery with a row of concrete posts that are 18″ high, indicating a boundary line. The trustees in 1865 included: George Falconer, Emerson Taylor, Charles Anderson, Ira Stafford, Henry McGill, George Hannah and James Conover.

Early burials date back to 1865. However, the original early burial registry up to 1930 has never been found. Some of the early prominent names of the families buried in the cemetery are Albertson, Conover, Falconer, Forester, Patchett, Shain and Taylor.

Location

Northeast corner Mississauga Road and Dundas Street West
Mississauga, ON

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This cemetery and the weathered stones are a testament to the early childhood mortality rate in the nineteenth century and a reminder of the pioneer families that settled here in the 1820s. Many of the tombstones are in poor condition and have been moved to a flower bed to better preserve them.

The cemetery is beautifully landscaped in a ‘passive park’ style, with an emphasis on preservation and opening the area to pedestrian access. Along with the Kindree children, there are over thirty accounted burials in this cemetery. The cemetery is designated under the Ontario Heritage Act.

History

Kindree Cemetery is one of the last visible reminders of a pioneer settlement called Lisgar and the pioneers that once called this corner of Mississauga home.

It’s the final resting place for seven children of Nathan and Mary Kindree. The gravestones show that the Kindree children died between 1829 and 1839. Nathan and Mary Kindree had a total of 12 children in total, five of which survived and raised their own families in the same community.

Location

3790 Derry Road West
Mississauga, ON

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This cemetery was originally known as King’s Burying Ground. In 2000, King’s Cemetery was designated as a historical site under the Ontario Heritage Act.

King Cemetery is a model for cemetery maintenance as mulched beds protect grave markers and historical aspects of the cemetery. The additional walkways and stepping stones and mulch help give access to grave marker stones as well.

History

King’s Cemetery was established in 1832, following the generous donation of one half acre of land by Charles King.

The land was part of an original 100 acre patent from the Crown. In 1868, Charles King sold his land to Robert Craig, who in 1869 sold the half acre in the south west half of Lot 11 collectively to Henry King, Robert McLeod, James Jackson, Edwards McBride, Charles Irvine and James Savage.

Location

7085 Dixie Road
Mississauga, ON

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Moore’s Cemetery is one of the last remaining remnants of pioneer life in the Malton area. It served for over 150 years and is associated with significant residents of the area. It contributes to an understanding of the original settlers of Malton.

This cemetery is represents nineteenth century cemetery design. It’s characterized by a natural setting, markers and monuments in a park like layout. It’s now an island of green surrounded by industry.

History

The cemetery is located on the former Moore property while the associated Presbyterian log chapel was situated on adjacent land, donated by James Trotter of York. In the 1920’s, Trotter donated half an acre to the trustees of the church. The rest of the lot was sold to the Moore family. Samuel Moore is considered to be the first pioneer of Malton.

The cemetery was part of the farm owned by Samuel Moore, and was restored in 1934 by the Malton Women’s Institute.

Location

2030 Derry Road East
Mississauga, ON

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This cemetery is an integral part of the Streetsville village, a local landmark, and a significant cultural landscape full of history.

History

Before Presbyterian Church was built next to the cemetery, interments were held in a forest. Timothy Street, whom Streetsville is name after, wished this interment situation to be remedied.

In 1824, Street sold the land to five trustees of the Presbyterian Church for five shillings. With this, Street sought to end the practice of interring the dead in a forest. For years Streetsville Memorial was the only Protestant burying ground.

In 1967, the grounds were restored. Broken stones were repaired and many were moved into large cemented walls. The brick and stone gateway was erected to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the incorporation of Streetsville village and the 10th anniversary of the City of Mississauga. The decorative stone work originally formed part of a prominent nineteenth century Streetsville home, the Solomon J. Barnhart House.

Location

299 Queen Street South
Mississauga, ON

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Streetsville Public Cemetery is a park-like setting, where mature trees abound, lining the roadway. The cemetery also offers a wildlife habitat for native woodland creatures. Older gravestones prevail in the southern section while newer ones comprise the northern part.

The cemetery exemplifies nineteenth century cemetery design in its layout and has evolved over time. It has historical value as an active cemetery which has continued to serve the community for over 100 years. The arrangement, symbolism and material of the monuments contribute to our understanding of the historical figures that they commemorate. In addition to historic burial practice, the cemetery yields information that contributes to our understanding of the areas citizens.

History

Streetsville Public Cemetery was established in 1892 when Streetsville Memorial Cemetery had reached capacity. It’s one of the most beautiful, well-landscaped cemeteries in southern Ontario as it overlooks the Credit River.

In 1890, the Streetsville Cemetery Company Ltd. formed with the goal to establish a burial ground for all religions. In May 1891, the Provincial Board of Health approved a site east of the Credit River for the cemetery.

The first burial appears to have been at the end of July, 1892. A five-year-old child by the name of Nathaniel William (Willie) Brown drowned in the Credit River at Barbertown on July 16, 1892. There are multiple stones within the cemetery which indicate dates of death before 1892; however, it is unlikely that there would have been burials before the survey date.

Location

1786 Bristol Road West
Mississauga, ON

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The cemetery includes a variety of grave marker forms. These include slabs, obelisks, columns and blocks. The stones are rather simple but some are incised with linear art and various motifs including doves, flowers, leaves and willow trees.

Heritage designation of Trinity Wesleyan Cemetery was approved in 2006 for its historical and contextual significance in accordance with the requirements of the Ontario Heritage Act.

History

The cemetery was established in 1842 and is the only remnant of a farming community within a modern industrial development area.

Despite the first interment occurring in 1842, the Trinity Wesleyan Cemetery was officially established in March of 1853 when local preacher John Hunt and his wife Sarah sold the land, 1 rod and 14 perches worth, to the trustees of the United Methodist Church. The last interment took place in 1971.

Location

1520 Britannia Road East
Mississauga, ON

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