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Government relations archive

The City of Mississauga works with other levels of government to ensure the City has the opportunity to benefit from available programs and funding to help us operate efficiently.

The following information is archived. It remains online for reference only.

Advocacy in past federal elections

2015 unofficial election results

On October 19, 2015 the following federal candidates were elected in Mississauga ridings:

  • Mississauga-Malton: Navdeep Bains
  • Mississauga East-Cooksville: Peter Fonseca
  • Mississauga-Erin Mills: Iqra Khalid
  • Mississauga-Lakeshore: Sven Spengemann
  • Mississauga-Streetsville: Gagan Sikand
  • Mississauga Centre: Omar Alghabra

(Preliminary Results information as shown on the Elections Canada website)

Message from Mayor Crombie

Dear Friends,

Welcome to the City of Mississauga’s new information page about the 42nd Federal Election which will take place on Monday October 19th, 2015.

Mississauga is Canada’s sixth largest city. I believe the issues facing our community are the issues facing the majority of Canadians.

Throughout these pages you will find more information about the policy positions that your City Councillors are advocating on your behalf. These include greater investments for transportation and infrastructure; affordable housing; and new initiatives to generate economic development opportunities.

Council works together with organizations like the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) and the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) – which bring together municipal leader leaders to shape the agendas of both the federal and provincial governments.

I encourage you to check back regularly as we continue to update these pages about ongoing news, events, and information about who your local Mississauga candidates are; which riding you reside in; and information from Election Canada about voting.

We are truly fortunate to call Mississauga, Ontario, and Canada, home. Democracy is the foundation of our country’s guiding principles.

On Monday October 19th, I encourage you to speak up, be heard, and cast your ballot in the best interest of our community.

Warmest Regards,

Bonnie Crombie, MBA, ICD.D
Mayor, City of Mississauga

Mississauga 2015 federal election debate

In June, Mississauga Council unanimously passed a resolution to host a local debate during the 2015 federal election on issues facing cities with a specific focus on our community.

Consistent with the advocacy work undertaken by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, this Mississauga debate will focus on three leading priorities: transit and infrastructure; economic development; and affordable housing.

There will be a Community of Panel of three representatives who will principally ask questions to candidates. They include:

  • Mayor Crombie, lead panelist for transportation/infrastructure;
  • Sheldon Leiba, former president and CEO with the Mississauga Board of Trade and Vice President, Network & Membership Relations with the Ontario Chamber of Commerce – lead panelist for economic development;
  • Anita Stellinga, Vice President of Community Investment with United Way Peel, lead panelist for affordable housing;

The following candidates will represent their parties during the debate:

  • Stella Ambler, Conservative Party, Mississauga-Lakeshore;
  • Peter Fonseca, Liberal Party, Mississauga East-Cooksville;
  • Linh Nguyen, Green Party, Mississauga Centre;
  • Farheen Khan, NDP, Mississauga Centre;

The Mayor’s Office reached out to regional organizers for each of the main political parties; the regional organizers chose which candidates would participate in our debate.

The debate will be sixty minutes in length, moderated by Michael A. Charbon, a public affairs commentator and television host with Rogers Cable 10.

This debate is a special edition of #CrombieConnects – Mayor Crombie’s monthly TV show on Rogers TV Cable 10. It will be taped on September 29 and replaying throughout the remainder of the campaign leading up to Election Day. Broadcast times are as follows:

  • Saturday, Oct. 3 at 8 p.m.
  • Sunday, Oct. 4 at 10 p.m.
  • Monday, Oct. 5 at 4 a.m.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 6 at 12 a.m.
  • Thursday, Oct. 8 at 7 a.m.
  • Saturday, Oct. 10 at 7 p.m.
  • Monday, Oct. 12 at 7 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Oct. 14 at 3 p.m.
  • Friday, Oct. 16 at 8 a.m.
  • Friday, Oct. 16 at 8 p.m.
  • Saturday, Oct. 17 at 5 p.m.
  • Sunday, Oct. 18 at 5 a.m.

Mississauga Ridings

Mississauga Centre Riding

  • Conservative: Julius Tiangson
  • NDP: Farheen Khan
  • Liberal: Omar Alghabra
  • Green: Linh Nguyen

Mississauga East-Cooksville Riding

  • Conservative: Wladyslaw Lizon
  • NDP: Ali Naqvi
  • Liberal: Peter Fonseca
  • Marxist-Leninist: Tim Sullivan

Mississauga-Erin Mills Riding

  • Conservative: Bob Dechert
  • NDP: Michelle Bilek
  • Liberal: Iqra Khalid
  • Green: Andrew Roblin

Mississauga-Lakeshore Riding

  • Conservative: Stella Ambler
  • NDP: Eric Guerbilsky
  • Liberal: Sven Spengemann
  • Marxist-Leninist: Dagmar Sullivan

Mississauga-Malton Riding

  • Conservative: Jagdish Grewal
  • Liberal: Navdeep Singh Bains
  • NDP: Dianne Douglas
  • Green: TBC

Mississauga-Streetsville Riding

  • Conservative: Brad Butt
  • Liberal: Gagan Sikand
  • NDP: Fayaz Karim
  • Green: Chris Hill

Visit Elections Canada website

Council Priority: the Missing Link

City Council has endorsed in principle, a study regarding a freight bypass rail line between the Canadian Pacific (CP) Line (Milton GO Rail corridor) west of Trafalgar Road in Milton and the Canadian National (CN) bypass Line at Bramalea. This concept is one option to permit for two-way, all-day GO service between Union Station and Kitchener via Malton on the Kitchener GO line as well as expansion of GO Train service to Cambridge.

The bypass would have three major benefits:

  • Provide an alternative to the challenge of widening the Milton and Kitchener GO Rail corridors
  • Remove heavy freight from the Milton and Kitchener GO Rail corridors;
  • Free up inner parts of the Milton and Kitchener GO Rail corridors for two-way service on the outer ends of these lines including new service to Cambridge and expanded service to Kitchener and Waterloo Region.

The study looked at the feasibility and business case of a new rail line to separate freight from passenger services and to connect the Milton GO line, west of Trafalgar Road in Milton to the CN Bramalea bypass line in Brampton, beside Highway 407. This new line would take heavy freight rail away from the Milton and Kitchener GO lines making these lines available for commuter rail.

The study by IBI Group cost $84,000 and was shared between the partnering municipalities: City of Mississauga, City of Toronto, Town of Milton and City of Cambridge (Kitchener, Waterloo, Region of Waterloo). The study recommends municipalities develop a process and work with Metrolinx, CN and CP to apply for funding from the Government of Canada.

Once approved, the study will be forwarded to Provincial and Federal Governments for consideration. It will also be shared with Metrolinx, CN and CP railways and the municipalities sponsoring the study.

The Missing Link is a proposed new rail corridor that would link the CN bypass line at Bramalea with the CP line through-route near the Milton-Mississauga border. The Missing Link proposes the separation freight from passenger services on the GO Transit Milton and Kitchener lines.

For more information about the Missing Link, please see the
Feasibility Study and Business Case of Constructing the Missing Link

Party websites

For more information about the political parties, your Mississauga candidates, and their policy platforms, please visit:

Stakeholder websites

For more information about the municipal stakeholder organizations that work to shape public policy and advocate for local priorities, please visit:

On May 2, 2011 the following federal candidates were elected in Mississauga ridings:

  • Bramalea-Gore-Malton: Bal Gosal
  • Mississauga-Brampton South: Eve Adams
  • Mississauga East-Cooksville: Wladyslaw Lizon
  • Mississauga-Erindale: Robert Dechert
  • Mississauga-South: Stella Ambler
  • Mississauga-Streetsville: Brad Butt

(Preliminary Results information as shown on the Elections Canada website)


Dear Citizens,

On behalf of the Mississauga City Council, thank you for your continued participation in the municipal process. On May 2, 2011, we will elect the next Government of Canada. More than ever before, municipalities across Canada are asking the federal government to help stimulate our economy, to keep our citizens safe, to maintain our municipal infrastructure and to keep our quality of life strong.

Our country has weathered the worldwide economic downturn better than most countries over the past three years, but not without difficulty. While economic recovery is occurring, it is still fragile. Your City Council understands this and is working hard to ensure the City of Mississauga emerges to a brighter future.

This federal election is critical to municipalities. We need real help on some very real and growing issues, and all candidates running for federal office must understand these local concerns and give support.  For every local tax dollar collected, cities get only 9 cents; the federal government gets 55 cents. Considering the scope of services that your city and region provide, it is clear that municipalities are required to fund an extensive list of programs with a very small portion of the overall tax dollar. We need federal government investment.

In 2011, our two priority issues are municipal infrastructure and public transit:

A. Municipal Infrastructure:

Canada’s national infrastructure deficit is estimated at $124 billion; Mississauga’s municipal infrastructure deficit is $1.5 billion. Based on historical costs, an annual injection of $77 million is required to close Mississauga’s infrastructure funding gap.

Though there has been significant construction and repair throughout our city in the past few years, the municipal infrastructure deficit continues to grow.

To help stem the tide against the economic downturn, all three orders of government joined forces to stimulate the economy and put people back to work. For Mississauga this was a positive event. The Infrastructure Stimulus Fund (ISF) and the Recreation Infrastructure Canada Fund (RInC) provided $104 million to the City of Mississauga from the provincial and federal
governments (with an additional $65 million the City provided) which supported the construction of 138 projects.

While the City was grateful for these funds, this was one-time funding only.  To
truly maintain our infrastructure in a state of good repair, permanent sustainable funding is required. The City of Mississauga’s ten year capital forecast shows $432 million in capital projects and lifecycle replacement costs as unfunded. Clearly, one-time funding will not meet the needs of municipalities in reducing the overwhelming municipal infrastructure
deficit.

Across Canada there has been much discussion and analysis on the state of municipal infrastructure including advocacy by FCM and the inaugural National Infrastructure Summit held in January, 2011, hosted by the City of Regina. The request to the federal government was clear, that there must be a commitment to develop a new, long-term, infrastructure investment
strategy that will renew the Building Canada Plan which is due to expire in 2014.

The question that candidates should answer is:
Will your party commit to developing a new, long-term, sustainable infrastructure investment plan to replace the Building Canada Plan when it expires in 2014?

B. Public Transit:

Residents and business owners across the City of Mississauga continue to tell us that reliable, efficient public transit is one of their biggest needs.  This does not only mean a great bus system to move within the City, but also a higher-order transit systems (light rail transit, bus rapid transit, etc.) on inter-regional corridors, linking riders between municipalities on a multi-modal transportation system in the Greater Toronto Area and beyond. Systems such as these can truly transform communities, but come with a very significant capital investment.

Mississauga’s goal is to double the transit ridership from 11% to 22% over the next four decades. To meet this, work is underway on designing higher-order systems and mobility hubs, improving travel times, developing parking strategies that support transit, directing growth to support public transit, etc.  The City’s 2011 capital budget shows transit as 42% of the total capital budget ($98.8 m) but a number of important transit projects remain unfunded.

The City of Mississauga is not alone on their desire for a safe, reliable, efficient, inter-regional system. The provincial government, the Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA), the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM), the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) and almost all urban areas within Canada are working toward the same thing.

We are still the only OECD country without a national transit investment framework.

The question that candidates should answer is:
Will your party commit to the creation of a comprehensive national transit policy framework and investment strategy including the indexation of the gas tax for municipalities?

We need the federal government to come to the table on issues of national municipal importance. I will be writing to all of the federal candidates to ask these questions and will post their responses on our City’s website for your information.  I encourage you to ask your local candidates about these important municipal issues as well – together we can use our collective voter power on these critical issues.

Sincerely,

HAZEL McCALLION, C.M., LL.D.

MAYOR


Federal Election 2011

Municipal Infrastructure and Public Transit

Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA) – Election Kit

Questions for Candidates

Each local candidate will be asked to answer the following questions.

  1. Will your party commit to developing a new, long-term, sustainable infrastructure investment plan to replace the Building Canada Plan when it expires in 2014?
  2. Will your party commit to the creation of a comprehensive national transit policy framework and investment strategy including the indexation of the gas tax for municipalities?

Answers received from the Candidates:

Bramalea-Gore-Malton

Conservative Candidate – Bal Gosal

Mississauga-Brampton South

Liberal Candidate – Navdeep Bains

Conservative Candidate – Eve Adams

Mississauga East-Cooksville

Conservative Candidate – Wladyslaw Lizon

Green Candidate – Jaymini Bhikha

Mississauga-Erindale

Liberal Candidate – Omar Alghabra

Conservative Candidate – Robert Dechert

Green Candidate – John Fraser

Mississauga-South

Liberal Candidate – Paul Szabo

Conservative Candidate – Stella Ambler

Mississauga-Streetsville

Conservative Candidate – Brad Butt

Advocacy in past provincial elections

Message from the Mayor

My fellow Mississauga Residents;

Mississauga Matters!

This is the message we must deliver to all provincial candidates and political parties in the lead up to the June 7, 2018 provincial election. The priorities of our residents are the priorities of our City and must be the priorities of the next provincial government.

Mississauga is a dynamic, diverse and growing city, home to almost 800,000 people and over 88,000 businesses. We are building a complete city, made up of complete communities connected by local and rapid transit – a place where people can live and work and raise a family. Mississauga is home to world-class community centres, hundreds of kilometres of trails connecting over 250 parks across our city. We have a quality of life that is second to none.

At the same time, we continue to face increased challenges to build and maintain the infrastructure – the roads, bridges, community centres, parks, trails, public transit, and so much more – that makes our city run. Good quality infrastructure is what makes Mississauga a place that people choose to be and where the world comes to work.

To continue to grow and prosper, Mississauga needs a committed provincial partner. We cannot do this alone because we simply do not have the tools needed to build the infrastructure necessary to keep Mississauga moving forward.

We need the provincial government to partner with us to make investments to build more housing that is affordable to the middle-income so that people can live and work in Mississauga.

We need the provincial government to continue to make investments in our local infrastructure to help us build community centres, roads, bridges, parks, trails, bike lanes and everything else that makes Mississauga a great place to live.

And, we need a provincial partner to make significant investments in our local and regional transit systems – like GO Transit and the Hurontario LRT – to allow us to break gridlock and congestion and get people and businesses moving.

Your priorities are our priorities too. They must also be the priorities of the next provincial government.

After all, we are all in this together.

On June 7th, I ask you to please take the time to vote for a candidate that understands that Mississauga Matters. Get engaged and informed, and most importantly, please vote.

Sincerely,

Bonnie Crombie
Mayor


Our priorities

Public transit: connected, seamless, rapid public transit

We’ve heard from residents that transit and transportation, and by extension congestion, remains a top priority for our city.

The City of Mississauga has a strategic vision that is only achievable if we build public transit systems that are reliable, efficient and sustainable. The City has worked closely with the provincial government and its transit agency, Metrolinx to build new public transit in our City, including the recently opened Mississauga Transitway. Our city wants to significantly increase the number of people who take transit which means there must a variety of transit systems that work together to improve travel times and enhance rider experience.

In order to get more residents using MiWay, we need a committed provincial partner to help fund the following projects:

The completion of the Hurontario LRT

While the province of Ontario and the City of Mississauga have committed to fully-funding the LRT and planning and design are well underway, the project is not yet complete. It is important that all candidates and political parties understand the importance of this project to the growth of Mississauga and follow through with their commitment to fully funding the LRT should they form government.

All-day, two-way GO service through Mississauga

All Day, Two-Way service on all three Mississauga GO Transit Lines, particularly the Milton line, is essential for our city’s future growth and economic competitiveness. Despite being the second busiest corridor in the GO Transit network, serving over 20,000 passengers per day and supporting over 77,000 jobs, the province has yet to commit to funding all-day two-way GO service on the Milton line.

All-day service on both the Milton and Kitchener GO Transit lines is currently prevented by the presence of heavy freight rail traffic that travels through both lines. The Missing Link can help achieve expanded all-day, two-way service on the Milton and Kitchener GO lines by relocating heavy freight rail elsewhere.

The Downtown Mississauga Terminal and Transitway Connection

In December 2017, the final station on the Mississauga Transitway opened. In order to complete the project a new transit terminal is needed in downtown Mississauga that will create a central mobility hub by connecting MiWay and GO Transit buses, as well as the Hurontario LRT. The downtown section of the transitway is the busiest and at present, buses are operating in mixed traffic. Building this terminal and connection will provide relief for both buses and cars in the downtown core.

Read the Mississauga transit brochure to learn why transit matters in Mississauga.

Related documents

Infrastructure: Building strong, sustainable communities

The quality of life of Mississauga residents relies on essential infrastructure such as roads, bridges, transit, parks, trails and community centres being in a state of good repair. Infrastructure is what makes our economy run, connects our communities, creates jobs, and makes Mississauga a destination for business and talent

The City of Mississauga currently owns approximately $8.9 billion worth of infrastructure. This year alone, there is a $260 million gap between what the City can afford to build and maintain, and what we need to build and maintain while keeping property taxes affordable for residents.

This gap exists because while municipalities own 60% of the country’s infrastructure, we only receive 8 cents from every tax dollar collected. This simply isn’t enough to fund city services and maintain infrastructure like roads, bridges and waterways in Canada’s sixth largest city.

The reality is that every year, this gap in funding only continues to grow.

In order to build Mississauga into a world-class city, we need the provincial government to commit to doing more to help Mississauga close this gap by providing long-term, predictable and sustainable infrastructure funding.

Read the Mississauga infrastructure brochure to learn what the City is responsible for.


Affordable housing

There is a housing affordability crisis in Mississauga, and the wider GTA. To address this crisis and ensure we have enough appropriate housing stock, Mississauga requires a committed provincial funding partner to help make Mississauga a place where people can live, work and play.

Housing is considered “affordable” when a household pays less than 30% of their total income on housing. In Mississauga, more than 33% of households are spending more than 30% of their income on housing – this is an issue that needs to be addressed.

That’s why in 2017, the City of Mississauga took the lead by developing a made-in-Mississauga plan to address housing affordability. The goal of “Making Room for the Middle” is to make 35% of available housing Mississauga affordable ($270,000 – $400,000 ownership/$1,200 per month rental) for middle-income earners ($55,000 – $100,000 household income).

Last year, the Ontario Government announced 16 measures to “cool” the housing market and increase affordability in their Fair Housing Plan. Many of the province’s measures are in alignment with the City’s “Making Room for the Middle” plan.

Six of the 40 recommendations made in our strategy require provincial support or legislative changes to give the City the ability to incentivize the building of affordable, middle-class housing.

These recommendations include:

  1. Create enduring and sustainable funding programs that realize developer timeframes and financial needs
  2. Provide affordable home ownership assistance to individuals
  3. Expand municipal revenue tools
  4. Consider taxation policies that incent affordable housing that include but are not limited to:
    • the creation of second units
    • rehab of existing purpose built rental housing
    • new purpose built rental housing
    • GST rebates or exemptions
  5. Explore tax credits and exemptions for affordable housing including but not limited to:
    • income tax credit (e.g. second unit homeowners)
    • land transfer tax exemptions
    • create land value capture tools for municipalities
    • low-income housing tax credits
  6. Provide standardized local housing data and consistent methodologies to measure housing affordability

Read the Mississauga affordable housing brochure to learn why affordable middle-income housing matters in Mississauga.

Related documents

Mississauga Matters Provincial Election Debate

 

On June 7, 2018 the following provincial candidates were elected in Mississauga ridings:

Party websites

For more information about the political parties, your Mississauga candidates, and their policy platforms, please visit:

Stakeholders

Open Letter to Party Leaders

Read Mayor Crombie’s open letter to party leaders.

Responses

Response from the Liberal Party

Related documents

On June 12th, 2014 the following provincial candidates were elected in Mississauga ridings:

  • Bramalea-Gore-Malton: Jagmeet Singh
  • Mississauga-Brampton South: Amrit Mangat
  • Mississauga East-Cooksville:  Dipika Damerla
  • Mississauga-Erindale: Harinder Takhar
  • Mississauga-South: Charles Sousa
  • Mississauga-Streetsville:  Bob Delaney

Note: this notice is posted using election results found on the Elections Ontario website.


Message from the Mayor

Dear Citizens,

Your participation in the democratic process is important to the City of Mississauga. On June 12, 2014 residents will once again elect a provincial government. The City of Mississauga is committed to helping residents understand our local issues, so you can be informed as candidates ask for your vote on June 12th.

Mississauga is recognized as the sixth largest city in Canada and one of the fastest growing major cities. Our residents are talented, diverse, cultured, and highly skilled. To continue with our success, we must ensure that our interests and views are well represented by the provincial government. Mississauga City Council has identified the following issues for the upcoming provincial election:

  • Public Transit
  • Sustainable Infrastructure
  • Interest Arbitration – Labour Costs for Emergency Services

Please explore our provincial election website to find more about our priority issues. Included in this site are questions we addressed to provincial parties; links to the Region of Peel and other important associations; Council endorsed corporate report and other material of interest.

We invite your participation and I encourage you to ask your local candidates about these important municipal issues.

HAZEL McCALLION,  C.M., LL.D.
MAYOR


Public Transit

Residents have identified Transit as one of the City’s priority issues. Having a reliable transportation infrastructure is important and the City is working to build sustainable and cost effective transit to help citizens improve their quality of life.
For many years, the City has worked alongside its partners to build ridership on the bus system, maintain and green the City’s fleet and facilities, work with adjacent municipalities to provide better connections and develop higher-order public transit systems that will move people faster and help decrease car congestion.

One of the City’s central concerns is funding for the Hurontario/Main Light Rail Transit system, which is a high priority project of the Metrolinx Plan. The project’s capital cost is approximately $1.5 billion; funding will be needed from the provincial (and federal) governments to assist in the development of this important regional system. The City cannot fund transit initiatives alone.

The Metrolinx Investment Strategy has recommended property tax and transit fare increases as potential revenue tools to fund regional transportation, including Mississauga’s LRT project. These recommendations are of concern to the City as these revenue tools may limit the City’s ability to raise and allocate revenue to fund general municipal operating and capital budgets going forward.

The questions that provincial political parties should answer is:

  • Will your party explicitly commit to fund 100% of the cost of the Mississauga LRT?
  • What revenue tools does your party support to ensure priority public transit systems are built in Mississauga and across the GTHA?

Sustainable infrastructure

The quality of life for Mississauga residents depends on basic infrastructure systems such as roads, highways, bridges, water supply systems, sewers, telecommunications facilities and transit systems being in a state of good repair. The City of Mississauga needs more than $116 Million every year to fund repairs and maintenance, and to put funds away for replacements in the future.  In 2014, the City will only raise $32 Million through property taxes, leaving a funding shortfall of almost $91 Million. Though there has been significant construction and repair throughout our City, the municipal infrastructure deficit continues to grow.

To truly maintain Mississauga’s infrastructure in a state of good repair, permanent sustainable funding is required. One-time funding will not meet the needs of municipalities in reducing the overwhelming municipal infrastructure deficit.

The question that provincial political parties should answer is:

  • Will your party commit to developing a new, long-term, sustainable infrastructure investment plan for Ontario municipalities? What is that plan and how will it be funded?

Interest Arbitration – Labour costs for Emergency Services

Our police, fire and emergency medical services play an important role in Mississauga by protecting our communities, caring for our health and keeping our streets safe. Labour costs for emergency services continue to escalate and contribute as a significant proportion of the municipal operating budget which is a concern for the City of Mississauga and other municipalities of Ontario.

The cost of wages, benefits, pensions, and other areas of compensation for emergency service workers are negotiated through collective bargaining agreements. Yet, when a negotiated settlement cannot be reached, these emergency services, who do not have the right to strike, proceed to the interest arbitration process. This process provides for arbitration to issue an award which is final and binding on all parties, but these awards fail to adhere to the requirement to consider a municipality’s ability to pay. This has caused higher settlements than what would have been freely negotiated. As a result, this process continues to increase the costs of emergency services and removes the municipal employer’s efforts to control labour costs.

The City of Mississauga is calling on the new provincial government to change the rules of arbitration governing the municipal public service and to ensure that fair and equitable rules are in place that can benefit residents of all municipalities.

The question that provincial political parties should answer is:

  • Will your party agree to change the rules of arbitration and make arbitration settlements more affordable to communities?

Questions for Provincial Party Leaders

Each party leader will be asked to answer the following questions:

Public transit

Will your party explicitly commit to fund 100% of the cost of the Mississauga LRT? What revenue tools does your party support to ensure priority public transit systems are built in Mississauga and across the GTHA?

Sustainable infrastructure

Will your party commit to developing a new, long-term, sustainable infrastructure investment plan for Ontario municipalities? What is that plan and how will it be funded?

Interest arbitration

Will your party agree to change the rules of arbitration and make arbitration settlements more affordable to communities?

Related documents

On October 6th, 2011 the following provincial candidates were elected in Mississauga ridings:

  • Bramalea-Gore-Malton: Jagmeet Singh
  • Mississauga-Brampton South: Amrit Mangat
  • Mississauga East-Cooksville:  Dipika Damerla
  • Mississauga-Erindale: Harinder Takhar
  • Mississauga-South: Charles Sousa
  • Mississauga-Streetsville:  Bob Delaney

Message from the Mayor

Dear Citizens,

Your participation in the democratic process is important to the City of Mississauga. On October 6, 2011 residents will once again elect a provincial government. The City of Mississauga is committed to helping residents understand our local issues, so you can be informed as candidates ask for your vote on October 6th.

Mississauga is recognized as the sixth largest city in Canada and one of the fastest growing major cities. Our residents are talented, diverse, cultured, and highly skilled. To continue with our success, we must ensure that our interests and views are well represented by the provincial government. Mississauga City Council has identified the following issues for the upcoming provincial election:

•        Fund and Grow Public Transit
•        City Building – Infrastructure Funding
•        Interest Arbitration – Labour Costs for Emergency Services
•        The Future of the Ontario Power Generation lands
•        Post-Secondary Education Funding
•        Air Quality – Clarkson Air Shed and Loreland Site

Please explore our website to find more about our priority issues. Included in this site are questions we addressed to provincial parties; links to the Region of Peel and other important associations; Council endorsed corporate reports and resolutions and other material of interest.

We invite your participation and I encourage you to ask your local candidates about these important municipal issues.

HAZEL McCALLION,  C.M., LL.D.
MAYOR


Questions to Provincial Party Leaders

Fund and Grow Public Transit

What actions will your party take to help fund and grow transit?  Will your party commit to financial support of the Mississauga LRT?

City building – infrastructure funding

Will your party commit to developing a new, long-term, sustainable infrastructure investment plan for Ontario municipalities?

Interest arbitration – labour costs for emergency services

Will your party agree to change the rules of arbitration and make arbitration settlements more affordable to communities?

The Future Of The OPG Lands

Will your party honour the commitment by the province to develop a shared vision for the OPG site as set out in the Memorandum of Understanding and continue to work with the City of Mississauga to redevelop Lakeview as visualized by the parties to the MOU, the citizens of Mississauga, the landowners, and the rest of Ontario?

Post-Secondary Education Funding

Will your party continue to honour the existing post-secondary education funding commitment?

Air Quality

Clarkson Air Shed

Will your party agree to the implementation of an air-zone management program with a pilot project in the Oakville-Clarkson area, and take action to see that they are fulfilled in the next provincial government mandate?

Loreland Site

Will your party ensure a full Environmental Assessment is conducted on the Greenfield South Power plant proposal? Will you as a Provincial candidate oppose the construction of the Greenfield South power plant?

Answers received

Related documents

Other issues of interest: PILTS

Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) are a set amount of funding paid for by hospitals, universities and colleges located in the municipality to compensate for municipal services. The Assessment Act requires all real property in Ontario to be subject to assessment and taxation. However, land owned by the federal or provincial government, public education institutions, and public hospitals are considered as an “exemption”. To compensate for the loss in taxation revenue, section 323 of the Municipal Act, 2001, provides municipalities with the authority to levy an amount payable. Thus, a municipality can receive payment for services provided from the province for a full-time student enrolled in a university/college, a resident in a correctional facility, and a patient in a provincial rated bed.

The Province of Ontario established in 1987 that the PILT rate would be $75 per student and per hospital bed. In 2010, the Trillium Health Centre (Mississauga site), University of Toronto Mississauga and Credit Valley Hospital paid a total PILT amount of $834,900. Council has asked that the PILT rate be increased to $240 to reflect the new financial realities that the City faces. With an increase of the PILT rate from $75 to $240, the City would receive $2,671,680; an increase of $1.8 million in funding. This funding is significant for Mississauga and provides relief from the pressures of inflation and increases to other service expenditures.

The City of Mississauga has lobbied the provincial government for changes to the legislation. Most recently, Council passed Resolution 0069-2011 to request the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing, and the Minister of Finance to increase the PILT rate. View links below for more information on PILTs.

Citizens of the City of Mississauga should be aware of the issues that most impact our city and require assistance from our provincial representatives.

The Mayor and Council have endorsed four reports supporting matters of importance relating to the October 10, 2007 provincial election.

Background information

Questions for candidates

Each party and local candidate will be asked to answer the following questions in writing by August 31, 2007:

  1. Do you commit to the measures outlined by the City of Mississauga regarding the need for investments in transportation and specifically, what additional measures and investments will you make in transportation in the next four years?
  2. Will you make the commitments outlined by the City of Mississauga regarding current value assessment, airport payments in lieu of taxes and tax incremental financing?
  3. Will you make the commitments outlined by the City of Mississauga regarding the underfunding of municipal services, including the uploading the costs of health and social services to the Province from the municipal property tax over the next three years and the phasing out of the GTA Pooling Program completely over the next three years?

Answers received from Leaders and Candidates:

Party Leaders

Liberal Leader – Dalton McGuinty

PC Leader – John Tory

NDP Leader – Howard Hampton

Bramalea-Gore-Malton

Liberal Candidate – Kuldip Kular

Mississauga-Brampton South

Liberal Candidate – Amrit Mangat

Mississauga East-Cooksville

Liberal Candidate – Peter Fonseca

Mississauga-Erindale

Liberal Candidate – Harinder Takhar

Mississauga-South

Liberal Candidate – Charles Sousa

Conservative Candidate – Tim Peterson

Mississauga-Streetsville

Liberal Candidate – Bob Delaney

Conservative Candidate – Nina Tangri

Advocacy in regional governance